Infrastructure is the winner of the 2019 Budget

australian budget winner is infrastructure

Infrastructure bonanza in Australia

The Federal Budget 2019 has just been announced and, as predicted, infrastructure has become a true political battlefield and a clear winner of the Government’s funding.

An unprecedented $100 billion will be spent on infrastructure

The 10-year infrastructure package has been increased from $75 billion to $100 billion. The additional money will go to the following projects:

Queensland

New projects of $4 billion, including:

• Bruce Highway $425 million
• Gateway Motorway (Bracken Ridge to Pine River) $800 million
• Warrego Highway $320 million
• Urban Congestion Fund $379 million
• Roads of Strategic Importance (North) $824 million
• Roads of Strategic Importance (South) $186 million

Cityscape of Sydney Downtown

New South Wales

New projects of $7.3 billion, including:
• M1 Pacific Motorway Extension to Raymond Terrace
$1.6 billion
• Western Sydney Rail $3.5 billion
• Princes Highway $500 million
• Urban Congestion Fund $254 million
• Roads of Strategic Importance
$496 million

The Razorback, scenic coastal view of Great Ocean Road, Victoria, Australia
The Razorback, scenic coastal view of Great Ocean Road, Victoria, Australia

Victoria

New projects of $6.2 billion, including:
• Suburban Roads Upgrades (South Eastern and Northern
Roads) $1.1 billion
• South Geelong to Waurn Ponds Rail $700 million
• Western Highway (Final Stage of Duplication from Ararat to
Stawell) $360 million
• Urban Congestion Fund $396 million
• Roads of Strategic Importance $490 million

Adelaide at sunset
In 2013 Adelaide was ranked as the fifth most liveable city in the world. The estimated resident population is about 1.3 million

South Australia

New projects of $2.6 billion, including:
• North-South Corridor $1.5 billion
• SA Regional Roads Package $260 million
• Urban Congestion Fund $341 million
• Roads of Strategic Importance $220 million

Perth Elizabeth Quay Bridge at sunset light on Swan river
Scenic and iconic Elizabeth Quay Bridge at sunset light on Swan River at entrance of Elizabeth Quay marina. The arched pedestrian bridge is a new tourist attraction in Perth, Western Australia.

Western Australia

New projects of $1.6 billion, including:
• Tonkin Highway $349 million
• Fremantle Traffic Bridge $115 million
• Albany Ring Road $140 million
• Urban Congestion Fund $122 million
• Roads of Strategic Importance (North) $393 million
• Roads of Strategic Importance (South) $142 million

Tasmania Panaroma of the Hazards Freycinet National Park
Panorama of The Hazards – Tasmania’s Freycinet National Park

Tasmania

New projects of $313 million, including:

• Tasmanian Freight Rail Revitalisation Program $68 million
• Urban Congestion Fund $35 million
• Roads of Strategic Importance $210 million

Desert road in the remote Australian Outback.

Northern Territory

New projects of $622 million, including:
• Roads of Strategic Importance $492 million

Australian Capital Territory

New projects of $50 million

National Initiatives

  • Major Project Business Case Fund $250 million
  • Roads of Strategic Importance funding increase from $3.5 billion to $4.5 billion
  • A new Road Safety Package $2.2 billion
  • Urban Congestion Fund increased from $1 billion to $4 billion including a new Commuter Car Park Fund $500 million

Fast Rail Plan

  • $2 billion to help deliver fast rail from Geelong to Melbourne
  • Establishing the National Faster Rail Agency
  • Fast rail business cases for Sydney to Newcastle, Sydney to Wollongong, Sydney to Parkes (via Bathurst and Orange), Melbourne to Greater Shepparton, Melbourne to Albury Wodonga, Melbourne to Traralgon, Brisbane to the regions of Moreton Bay and the Sunshine Coast, and Brisbane to the Gold Coast

Video Credit: Wall Street Journal via YouTube

Josh Frydenberg, the treasurer said: “Cranes, hard hats and heavy machinery will be seen across the country as we build Australia for current and future generations.”

“We will deliver new infrastructure projects to ease congestion in our cities. To unlock the potential of our regions. To better manage population growth. To improve safety on our roads. We know you want to be there for the school drop-off, to help kids with their homework and spend more time together at the dinner table.

“A strong economy needs ongoing investment in roads, rails, bridges, dams and ports.”

Why is the Government spending so much money on infrastructure? 

Overseas migration plays a significant role in population growth in Australia.

Australia’s population is expected to reach 30 million by 2029 and there is no doubt that this growth will put pressure on infrastructure, housing, transport, service delivery, and the environment.

The Government is introducing changes to the migration program by lowering the permanent migration ceiling and introducing two new regional provisional visas to encourage migrants to settle in regional areas instead of big cities. These visas give a pathway to residency after three years.

Explore who are the Winners and Loser of the Federal Budget 2019


If you would like to be part of the infrastructure boom in Australia or New Zealand, register your CV here or search our jobs.

ConsultANZ Recruitment specializes in the civil engineering, construction, surveying and infrastructure sectors.

ConsultANZ_recruitment-team-civil-engineering-construction-surveying


Source: © Commonwealth of Australia 2019 under a Creative Commons BY Attribution 3.0 Australia Licence

Based on the Commonwealth of Australia data

Disclaimer

Information provided on this web site “Site” by ConsultANZ, is intended for reference only. The information contained herein is designed solely to provide guidance to the user and is not intended to be a substitute for the user seeking personalized professional advice based on specific factual situations.

ConsultANZ makes no representations or warranties as to the contents or accuracy of the information contained in this publication. To the extent permitted by law, ConsultANZ disclaims liability to any person or organisation in respect of anything done, or omitted to be done, in reliance upon information contained in this publication.